Bird Girl Irony

This “bird girl” statue used to be in the Bonaventure cemetery when it was photographed by Jack Leigh and used on the cover of the hugely popular book, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, by John Berendt.

As a result of it’s fame, the grave site was overrun with tourists so the statue was removed and now stands in a room at the Telfair Academy in Savannah in front of a wall-sized mural of the cemetery background so you can take a photograph of it just like the one on the cover of the book.

Image result from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_in_the_Garden_of_Good_and_Evil

Teaching the Controversy

79th St and Central Park West, New York

The plaque says, “Addressing the Statue,” and notes that while some love the historic statue, others abhor the clear subservient stance of the Native and African American.

In fact, the plaque does not so much address the statue’s problematic nature as leverage it to invite visitors to enter the museum “to learn more,” one of the natural long-term outcomes of Ronald Reagan’s charge to mediate everything in the marketplace.

A few months ago the statue was surrounded by stanchions to keep anti-racists at bay. Evidently the Museum has calculated that zealousness to have abated.

Women’s Rights Pioneers

The Mall, Central Park

Took a walk last weekend to see the first statue of (real) women in Central Park, poignantly a point of tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Danny’s

Walking along Central Street in the Edge we noticed an interesting rock sticking up from some palm fronds – it looked like perhaps it had been carved into an animal shape. Hanging over the railing, hunting for the right angle from which to photograph it we were hailed from within a deep garden by Jazzmen who invited us to walk around the building to the back where he took us on a tour of the art park, full of scavenged odds and ends (and no trespassing signs) deposited in nooks and grottoes throughout the lush plot whose owner, Danny, it seemed we were expected to know.

Click any image to see them all enlarged.